Belize, Education, Issues, Nationality, Patriotism, Politics, Thoughts

Did You Know – Central America


Who had claim over Central America first? The first Mexican Empire…. Southern Belize and Guatemala was part of the Guatemala District. The map shows the twenty-four districts of the Empire.

Mexican Empire
Once the First Mexican Empire broke up, the Federal Republic of Central America was formed, the member states?

Original Members:

  • Costa Rica
  • El Salvador
  • Guatemala
  • Honduras
  • Nicaragua
  • Los Altos

Current Members:

  • Costa Rica
  • El Salvador
  • Guatemala
  • Honduras
  • Mexico
  • Nicaragua

Federal Republic of Central America

The U.S. and Britain signed the Clayton-Bulwer Treaty in 1850. Article 1 of the Treaty agreed that the two countries would not “fortify, or colonize, or assume, or exercise any dominion over Nicaragua, Costa Rica, the Mosquito Coast, or any part of Central America”. British Honduras was declared to be unaffected by the Clayton-Bulwer Treaty and Belize’s southern border was recognized as the Sarstoon River..

I won’t give you all the data, you will need to do some work and research to learn your history and better educate yourself about what are the real facts about this issue…

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6 thoughts on “Did You Know – Central America”

  1. EL TRATADO CLAYTON BULWER…SI APLICA A “ANY PART OF CENTRAL AMERICA” INCLUYE TODO BELICE, TODA CENTRO AMERICA.Mas claro no canta un gallo!!!

    1. Como canta el gallo …

      At this time the Nicaragua route was thought to be the most feasible one for a ship canal, for the reason that Lake Nicaragua and the San Juan river might, it was believed, be made use of for a part of the way. But an obstacle to the free use of this route now presented itself, in the fact that the mouth of the San Juan river, and hence the eastern terminus of the proposed canal, was under the dominion of England. She had recently taken possession of the small town of San Juan del Norte, situated at the entrance to the above-named river, and had changed its name to Greytown, raising over it what was declared to be the Mosquito flag. The alleged ground of this action was, that this place was a part of the territory of the Mosquito Indians, over whom England had, it was asserted, exercised a protectorate for two hundred years. The so-called Mosquito coast extended indefinitely several hundred miles along the coasts of the republics of Honduras and Nicaragua. England had, moreover, a settlement on the main-land, farther to the north, called British Honduras, or Belize; she also laid claim to the Bay Islands, situated in the Bay of Honduras, as dependencies of Belize.

      The government of the United States, alarmed at this preponderance of British influence in Central America, cast about for the means of counteracting it. To oust England from her strong position by force was felt to be much too grave an undertaking, even were the United States disposed to attempt it. But the American statesmen of that day were, as a rule, only intent on securing a free transit across the isthmus not under the exclusive control of any European nation. They resolved, therefore, upon a peaceful and conciliatory policy: if England could not be got rid of, yet she might consent to act in conjunction with the United States in guaranteeing the proposed isthmus transit.

      Especially:

      exercised a protectorate for two hundred years. The so-called Mosquito coast extended indefinitely several hundred miles along the coasts of the republics of Honduras and Nicaragua. England had, moreover, a settlement on the main-land, farther to the north, called British Honduras, or Belize; she also laid claim to the Bay Islands, situated in the Bay of Honduras, as dependencies of Belize.

    2. Y canta ….

      At the time of the execution of this treaty England claimed, as we have seen, dominion over ( i ) the Mosquito coast, (2) British Honduras, ( 3 ) the Bay Islands. Before the final exchange of ratifications of the treaty, Sir H. L. Bulwer filed a paper at the State Department in Washington declaring that " Her Majesty does not understand the engagements of that convention to apply to Her Majesty's settlement at Honduras, or to its dependencies." Mr. Clayton answered, in a note of July 4, acknowledging that he "understood British Honduras was not embraced in the treaty of the 19th day of April last, but at the same time declining to affirm or deny the British title in their settlement or its alleged dependencies." He says further, "The consent of the Senate was not required, and the treaty was ratified as it stood when it was made."

      England then renounced her dominion over Greytown, but continued to exercise a protectorate over the Mosquito Indians; and shortly after the ratification of the treaty, proceeded to erect the Bay Islands into a separate colony. This, the United States contended, was a direct violation of the stipulations of the treaty; and immediately thereupon a controversy arose in regard to the interpretation of the treaty. The British government took the position that the first article of the treaty related only to future acts, and did not embrace places in their possession at the time the treaty was made. This construction was rejected by the United States; they were willing to admit the British construction in the case of the Belize, provided the boundary should be satisfactorily settled; but as to the Mosquito coast and the Bay Islands, such construction would defeat the very object of the treaty.

      Mr. Cass assured the English government that the United States would be satisfied if the proposed treaties should adjust the disputes in regard to the Mosquito protectorate, the Bay Islands, and the boundary of Belize, "in accordance with the general tenor of the American interpretation of the treaty." This plan proved successful. Treaties were concluded ( i ) with Guatemala in 1859, by which the boundaries of Belize were determined; (2) with Honduras, in the same year, by which the Bay Islands were given up to that State; (3 ) with Nicaragua in 1860 (also by that with Honduras), by which the British protectorate over the Mosquitos was withdrawn.

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